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  • Saivam (free)

    Pages: 90
    Language: ENGLISH
    Rating
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Description

Shiva is a Sanskrit word having an adjective meaning “pure”. It also means “The Auspicious One”.

God Shiva having multiple meanings such as “The Pure One”, or the One who might never affected by three Gunas of Nature (Sattva Rajas, and Tama) or the One who purifies living beings by the utterance of His name.. The Supreme God of Hindu Shiva is considered as he has No Aadi or Anta That He Has No Birth or Death.

According to Hindu mythology Lord Shiva is the destroyer in the main three supreme God. There are three supreme gods 1st one is Lord Shiva, second one is Brahma and third one is VISHNU.

Lord Shiva is the destroyer and also has a positive side in that destruction usual leads to new forms of existence. Lord Shiva is described in art with four hand, four faces and three eyes. The third eye keeps this power to destroy the creation, not only creation of humans it includes god.

Shiva, the Mahadeva, represents one of the three visible forms, or the functional aspects of God, namely, the creation, preservation and dissolution, that is, bringing the cosmos into existence, sustaining it and finally withdrawing it from existing. Lord Shiva represents the last of these three aspects, that is, dissolution or destruction of the cosmos. The other two aspects, the creation and the preservation, are represented respectively by Prajapati or Brahma, and Vishnu. Prajapati Brahma and Vishnu are Vedic gods. In the Rigveda, Prajapati and Brahma are mentioned as two gods, though both almost alike responsible for the act of Creation. Hence, in later Vedic literature, they merge into one entity, and are sometimes alluded to as Prajapati Brahma and sometimes as two synonymous terms alternating each other. In Puranic literature, Brahma gets pre-eminence and the term Prajapati is used only as the other name of Brahma to avoid monotonous repetition of the same nomenclature. Initially, that is, in the Rigveda, Vishnu is a subordinate type of god, but later by Puranic era, he attains the status of the Lord of the universe and the principal Vedic god.